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Issue 34, 2015
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Liquid-phase step-by-step growth of an iron cyanide coordination framework on LiCoO2 particle surfaces

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Abstract

Surface modification of inorganic objects with metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) – organic–inorganic hybrid framework materials with infinite networks – opens wide windows for potential applications. In order to derive a target property, the key is the ability to fine tune the degree of modification. Solution-based step-by-step growth techniques provide excellent control of layer thickness which can be varied with the number of deposition cycles. Such techniques with MOFs have been mainly applied to flat substrates, but not to particle surfaces before. Here, we present the facile surface modification of inorganic particles with a framework compound under operationally simple ambient conditions. A solution-based sequential technique involving the alternate immersion of LiCoO2 (LCO) – a positive electrode material for a lithium ion battery – into FeCl2·4H2O and K3[Fe(CN)6] solutions results in the formation of Prussian blue (PB) nanolayers on the surface of the LCO particles (PBNL@LCO). The PB growth is finely controlled by the number of immersion cycles. An electrochemical cell with PBNL@LCO as a positive electrode material exhibits a discharge capacity close to the specific capacity of LCO. The results open a new direction for creating suitable interfacial conditions between electrode materials and electrolytes in secondary battery materials.

Graphical abstract: Liquid-phase step-by-step growth of an iron cyanide coordination framework on LiCoO2 particle surfaces

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
11 Mar 2015
Accepted
12 May 2015
First published
13 May 2015

This article is Open Access

Dalton Trans., 2015,44, 15279-15285
Article type
Paper
Author version available

Liquid-phase step-by-step growth of an iron cyanide coordination framework on LiCoO2 particle surfaces

R. Makiura, S. Teragawa, K. Tsuchiyama, A. Hayashi, K. Tadanaga and M. Tatsumisago, Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 15279
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT00968E

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