Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 19, 2015
Previous Article Next Article

The development of paper microfluidic devices for presumptive drug detection

Author affiliations

Abstract

A paper microfluidic device has been developed for the presumptive testing of seized drugs in forensic casework. The procedure involves creating hydrophilic channels on chromatographic paper using wax printing and thermal lamination. The channels are connected to a single stem that draws an unknown analyte solution up into 6 different lanes. A different colorimetric reaction occurs within each lane, permitting the multiplexed detection of a variety of different compounds, including cocaine, opiates, ketamine, and various phenethyl amines. Furthermore, the linear orientation of the lanes permits series of reactants to be placed in each channel, enhancing stability and permitting sequential interaction with the analyte as the solvent front passes through each individual reagent. The resultant device was characterized for sensitivity and tested with a variety of common interferences and drug diluents. It should prove a useful device for screening seized drugs.

Graphical abstract: The development of paper microfluidic devices for presumptive drug detection

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 03 Jun 2015, accepted on 05 Aug 2015 and first published on 07 Aug 2015


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C5AY01432H
Author version
available:
Download author version (PDF)
Anal. Methods, 2015,7, 8025-8033

  •   Request permissions

    The development of paper microfluidic devices for presumptive drug detection

    G. Musile, L. Wang, J. Bottoms, F. Tagliaro and B. McCord, Anal. Methods, 2015, 7, 8025
    DOI: 10.1039/C5AY01432H

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements