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Issue 17, 2015
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Emergence of tunable resistive pulse sensing as a biosensor

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Abstract

The article is written as a guide and tutorial that focuses on the use of Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensing, TRPS, as a platform for the detection of biological analytes. Within the field of biosensors there is a continuous emergence of new technologies or adaptations to platforms that push the limits of detection or expand dynamic ranges. TRPS is both unique and powerful in its ability to detect a wide range of biological analytes; including metabolites, proteins, cellular vesicles, viruses and whole cells. Each analyte can be analysed on the same platform without modification by changing the pore size, and is simple enough to follow to allow users from a range of backgrounds to start developing their own assays. The instrument can provide information regarding analyte concentration, size, and charge. Here we hope to give an overview of where this technology is being used and provide some guidance to new users, in the hope it will inspire and enable future experiments.

Graphical abstract: Emergence of tunable resistive pulse sensing as a biosensor

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Article information


Submitted
19 Dec 2014
Accepted
23 Jan 2015
First published
23 Jan 2015

This article is Open Access

Anal. Methods, 2015,7, 7055-7066
Article type
Tutorial Review

Emergence of tunable resistive pulse sensing as a biosensor

E. L. C. J. Blundell, L. J. Mayne, E. R. Billinge and M. Platt, Anal. Methods, 2015, 7, 7055
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY03023K

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material.

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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