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Issue 5, 2015
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Isothermal DNA origami folding: avoiding denaturing conditions for one-pot, hybrid-component annealing

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Abstract

The DNA origami technique offers great potential for nanotechnology. Using biomolecular self-assembly, defined 2D and 3D nanoscale DNA structures can be realized. DNA origami allows the positioning of proteins, fluorophores or nanoparticles with an accuracy of a few nanometers and enables thereby novel nanoscale devices. Origami assembly usually includes a thermal denaturation step at 90 °C. Additional components used for nanoscale assembly (such as proteins) are often thermosensitive, and possibly damaged by such harsh conditions. They have therefore to be attached in an extra second step to avoid defects. To enable a streamlined one-step nanoscale synthesis – a so called one-pot folding – an adaptation of the folding procedures is required. Here we present a thermal optimization of this process for a 2D DNA rectangle-shaped origami resulting in an isothermal assembly protocol below 60 °C without thermal denaturation. Moreover, a room temperature protocol is presented using the chemical additive betaine, which is biocompatible in contrast to chemical denaturing approaches reported previously.

Graphical abstract: Isothermal DNA origami folding: avoiding denaturing conditions for one-pot, hybrid-component annealing

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
23 Jul 2014
Accepted
02 Dec 2014
First published
03 Dec 2014

Nanoscale, 2015,7, 2102-2106
Article type
Paper

Isothermal DNA origami folding: avoiding denaturing conditions for one-pot, hybrid-component annealing

A. Kopielski, A. Schneider, A. Csáki and W. Fritzsche, Nanoscale, 2015, 7, 2102
DOI: 10.1039/C4NR04176C

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