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Issue 23, 2015
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Self-assembly via microfluidics

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Abstract

The self-assembly of amphiphilic building blocks has attracted extensive interest in myriad fields in recent years, due to their great potential in the nanoscale design of functional hybrid materials. Microfluidic techniques provide an intriguing method to control kinetic aspects of the self-assembly of molecular amphiphiles by the facile adjustment of the hydrodynamics of the fluids. Up to now, there have been several reports about one-step direct self-assembly of different building blocks with versatile and multi-shape products without templates, which demonstrated the advantages of microfluidics. These assemblies with different morphologies have great applications in various areas such as cancer therapy, micromotor fabrication, and controlled drug delivery.

Graphical abstract: Self-assembly via microfluidics

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Publication details

The article was first published on 21 Oct 2015


Article type: Focus
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC90116B
Lab Chip, 2015,15, 4383-4386
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    Self-assembly via microfluidics

    L. Wang and S. Sánchez, Lab Chip, 2015, 15, 4383
    DOI: 10.1039/C5LC90116B

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