Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 3, 2015
Previous Article Next Article

Dynamic acoustic field activated cell separation (DAFACS)

Author affiliations

Abstract

Advances in diagnostics, cell and stem cell technologies drive the development of application-specific tools for cell and particle separation. Acoustic micro-particle separation offers a promising avenue for high-throughput, label-free, high recovery, cell and particle separation and isolation in regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate a novel approach utilizing a dynamic acoustic field that is capable of separating an arbitrary size range of cells. We first demonstrate the method for the separation of particles with different diameters between 6 and 45 μm and secondly particles of different densities in a heterogeneous medium. The dynamic acoustic field is then used to separate dorsal root ganglion cells. The shearless, label-free and low damage characteristics make this method of manipulation particularly suited for biological applications. Advantages of using a dynamic acoustic field for the separation of cells include its inherent safety and biocompatibility, the possibility to operate over large distances (centimetres), high purity (ratio of particle population, up to 100%), and high efficiency (ratio of separated particles over total number of particles to separate, up to 100%).

Graphical abstract: Dynamic acoustic field activated cell separation (DAFACS)

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Publication details

The article was received on 30 Sep 2014, accepted on 21 Nov 2014 and first published on 04 Dec 2014


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC01153H
Author version
available:
Download author version (PDF)
Lab Chip, 2015,15, 802-810
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
  •   Request permissions

    Dynamic acoustic field activated cell separation (DAFACS)

    G. D. Skotis, D. R. S. Cumming, J. N. Roberts, M. O. Riehle and A. L. Bernassau, Lab Chip, 2015, 15, 802
    DOI: 10.1039/C4LC01153H

    This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material.

    Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

    • For reproduction of material from NJC:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
      [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
    • For reproduction of material from PPS:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

    Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements