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Issue 8, 2015
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Ruthenium complexes as antimicrobial agents

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Abstract

One of the major advances in medical science has been the development of antimicrobials; however, a consequence of their widespread use has been the emergence of drug-resistant populations of microorganisms. There is clearly a need for the development of new antimicrobials – but more importantly, there is the need for the development of new classes of antimicrobials, rather than drugs based upon analogues of known scaffolds. Due to the success of the platinum anticancer agents, there has been considerable interest in the development of therapeutic agents based upon other transition metals – and in particular ruthenium(II/III) complexes, due to their well known interaction with DNA. There have been many studies of the anticancer properties and cellular localisation of a range of ruthenium complexes in eukaryotic cells over the last decade. However, only very recently has there been significant interest in their antimicrobial properties. This review highlights the types of ruthenium complexes that have exhibited significant antimicrobial activity and discusses the relationship between chemical structure and biological processing – including site(s) of intracellular accumulation – of the ruthenium complexes in both bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

Graphical abstract: Ruthenium complexes as antimicrobial agents

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Article information


Submitted
17 Oct 2014
First published
27 Feb 2015

This article is Open Access

Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015,44, 2529-2542
Article type
Review Article

Ruthenium complexes as antimicrobial agents

F. Li, J. G. Collins and F. R. Keene, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, 44, 2529
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS00343H

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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