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Issue 17, 2014
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Elucidating the nanoscale origins of organic electronic function by conductive atomic force microscopy

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Abstract

Electronic and optoelectronic devices comprising organic materials are highly promising for mechanically flexible and low-cost applications. In recent years, conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) has played a significant part in deciphering the nanoscopic and mesoscopic origins of organic electronic function. C-AFM is uniquely capable of measuring local electrical properties with nanoscale resolution; moreover, in conjunction with complementary atomic force microscope modes, C-AFM enables simultaneous mapping of nanoscale structure and electrical function. This feature article highlights recent progress in applying C-AFM to characterize organic electronic systems including self-assembled monolayers, graphene and related materials, organic semiconductors, and organic photovoltaic heterojunctions.

Graphical abstract: Elucidating the nanoscale origins of organic electronic function by conductive atomic force microscopy

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Article information


Submitted
16 Oct 2013
Accepted
09 Dec 2013
First published
11 Dec 2013

J. Mater. Chem. C, 2014,2, 3118-3128
Article type
Feature Article

Elucidating the nanoscale origins of organic electronic function by conductive atomic force microscopy

J. M. Mativetsky, Y. Loo and P. Samorì, J. Mater. Chem. C, 2014, 2, 3118
DOI: 10.1039/C3TC32050B

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