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Issue 7, 2014

Thermal-runaway experiments on consumer Li-ion batteries with metal-oxide and olivin-type cathodes

Author affiliations

Abstract

Li-ion batteries play an ever-increasing role in our daily life. Therefore, it is important to understand the potential risks involved with these devices. In this work we demonstrate the thermal runaway characteristics of three types of commercially available Li-ion batteries with the format 18650. The Li-ion batteries were deliberately driven into thermal runaway by overheating under controlled conditions. Cell temperatures up to 850 °C and a gas release of up to 0.27 mol were measured. The main gas components were quantified with gas-chromatography. The safety of Li-ion batteries is determined by their composition, size, energy content, design and quality. This work investigated the influence of different cathode-material chemistry on the safety of commercial graphite-based 18650 cells. The active cathode materials of the three tested cell types were (a) LiFePO4, (b) Li(Ni0.45Mn0.45Co0.10)O2 and (c) a blend of LiCoO2 and Li(Ni0.50Mn0.25Co0.25)O2.

Graphical abstract: Thermal-runaway experiments on consumer Li-ion batteries with metal-oxide and olivin-type cathodes

Article information


Submitted
11 Oct 2013
Accepted
26 Nov 2013
First published
27 Nov 2013

This article is Open Access

RSC Adv., 2014,4, 3633-3642
Article type
Paper

Thermal-runaway experiments on consumer Li-ion batteries with metal-oxide and olivin-type cathodes

A. W. Golubkov, D. Fuchs, J. Wagner, H. Wiltsche, C. Stangl, G. Fauler, G. Voitic, A. Thaler and V. Hacker, RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 3633 DOI: 10.1039/C3RA45748F

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. You can use material from this article in other publications without requesting further permissions from the RSC, provided that the correct acknowledgement is given.

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