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Issue 3, 2014
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Spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition: a new laboratory and industrial tool for low-cost photovoltaics

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Abstract

Recently, a new approach to atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been developed that doesn't require vacuum and is much faster than conventional ALD. This is achieved by separating the precursors in space rather than in time. This approach is most commonly called Spatial ALD (SALD). In our lab we have been using/developing a novel atmospheric SALD system to fabricate active components for new generation solar cells, showing the potential of this novel technique for the fabrication of high quality materials that can be integrated into devices. In this minireview we will introduce the basics of SALD and illustrate its great potential by highlighting recent results in the field of photovoltaics.

Graphical abstract: Spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition: a new laboratory and industrial tool for low-cost photovoltaics

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Article information


Submitted
18 Nov 2013
Accepted
06 Feb 2014
First published
06 Feb 2014

This article is Open Access

Mater. Horiz., 2014,1, 314-320
Article type
Minireview
Author version available

Spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition: a new laboratory and industrial tool for low-cost photovoltaics

D. Muñoz-Rojas and J. MacManus-Driscoll, Mater. Horiz., 2014, 1, 314
DOI: 10.1039/C3MH00136A

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