Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 6, 2014
Previous Article Next Article

Nanoparticle emissions from traditional pottery manufacturing

Author affiliations

Abstract

Traditional pottery manufacturing involves firing of the ceramics in kilns, a process that leads to high concentrations of airborne particles that are harmful to human health. In order to assess the associated exposure levels and the involved risks, here, for the first time, we investigate the size, the concentration and the elemental composition of the particles emitted during the different stages of the ceramic firing process. Number size distributions of the emitted particles, having diameters in the range from 10 nm to 20 μm, were measured in a traditional small-sized pottery studio using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and an Optical Particle Counter (OPC). The measurements showed dominance of the nanoparticle mode (i.e., particles smaller than 100 nm) when the kiln reached temperatures above 600 °C. The mean size of the particles ranged from 30 to 70 nm and their peak number concentration was 6.5 × 105 cm−3 during the first stage of the firing process where the ceramics were unpainted and unglazed. During the second stage of the firing process, where the ceramics were painted and glazed, the mean particle size ranged from 15 to 40 nm and their number concentration peaked at 1.2 × 106 cm−3. Elemental analysis of individual particles collected during the two firing stages and studied by Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy showed that the emitted nanoparticles contain significant amounts of lead. These findings provide new information for understanding the health impacts of traditional pottery manufacturing, and underline the need for adopting adequate measures to control nanoparticle emissions at the source.

Graphical abstract: Nanoparticle emissions from traditional pottery manufacturing

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 20 Dec 2013, accepted on 18 Mar 2014 and first published on 19 Mar 2014


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00709J
Author version
available:
Download author version (PDF)
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014,16, 1489-1494
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
  •   Request permissions

    Nanoparticle emissions from traditional pottery manufacturing

    A. Voliotis, S. Bezantakos, M. Giamarelou, M. Valenti, P. Kumar and G. Biskos, Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014, 16, 1489
    DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00709J

    This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material.

    Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

    • For reproduction of material from NJC:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
      [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
    • For reproduction of material from PPS:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

    Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements