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Issue 24, 2014
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Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) increases the solubility of cholesterol when incorporated in lipid membranes

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Abstract

Cholesterol has been well established as a mediator of cell membrane fluidity. By interacting with lipid tails, cholesterol causes the membrane tails to be constrained thereby reducing membrane fluidity, well known as the condensation effect. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), the main ingredient in aspirin, has recently been shown to increase fluidity in lipid bilayers by primarily interacting with lipid head groups. We used high-resolution X-ray diffraction to study both ASA and cholesterol coexisting in model membranes of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). While a high cholesterol concentration of 40 mol% cholesterol leads to the formation of immiscible cholesterol bilayers, as was reported previously, increasing the amount of ASA in the membranes between 0 to 12.5 mol% was found to significantly increase the fluidity of the bilayers and dissolve the cholesterol plaques. We, therefore, present experimental evidence for an interaction between cholesterol and ASA on the level of the cell membrane at elevated levels of cholesterol and ASA.

Graphical abstract: Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) increases the solubility of cholesterol when incorporated in lipid membranes

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Article information


Submitted
16 Feb 2014
Accepted
08 Apr 2014
First published
11 Apr 2014

Soft Matter, 2014,10, 4275-4286
Article type
Paper
Author version available

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) increases the solubility of cholesterol when incorporated in lipid membranes

R. J. Alsop, M. A. Barrett, S. Zheng, H. Dies and M. C. Rheinstädter, Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 4275
DOI: 10.1039/C4SM00372A

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