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Issue 12, 2014
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Integrated lab-on-chip biosensing systems based on magnetic particle actuation – a comprehensive review

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Abstract

The demand for easy to use and cost effective medical technologies inspires scientists to develop innovative lab-on-chip technologies for point-of-care in vitro diagnostic testing. To fulfill medical needs, the tests should be rapid, sensitive, quantitative, and miniaturizable, and need to integrate all steps from sample-in to result-out. Here, we review the use of magnetic particles actuated by magnetic fields to perform the different process steps that are required for integrated lab-on-chip diagnostic assays. We discuss the use of magnetic particles to mix fluids, to capture specific analytes, to concentrate analytes, to transfer analytes from one solution to another, to label analytes, to perform stringency and washing steps, and to probe biophysical properties of the analytes, distinguishing methodologies with fluid flow and without fluid flow (stationary microfluidics). Our review focuses on efforts to combine and integrate different magnetically actuated assay steps, with the vision that it will become possible in the future to realize integrated lab-on-chip biosensing assays in which all assay process steps are controlled and optimized by magnetic forces.

Graphical abstract: Integrated lab-on-chip biosensing systems based on magnetic particle actuation – a comprehensive review

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Publication details

The article was received on 30 Dec 2013, accepted on 10 Mar 2014 and first published on 10 Mar 2014


Article type: Critical Review
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC51454D
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Lab Chip, 2014,14, 1966-1986
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    Integrated lab-on-chip biosensing systems based on magnetic particle actuation – a comprehensive review

    A. van Reenen, A. M. de Jong, J. M. J. den Toonder and M. W. J. Prins, Lab Chip, 2014, 14, 1966
    DOI: 10.1039/C3LC51454D

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