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Issue 7, 2014
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Effects of black tea on body composition and metabolic outcomes related to cardiovascular disease risk: a randomized controlled trial

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Abstract

There is increasing evidence that tea and its non-caffeine components (primarily flavonoids) contribute to cardiovascular health. Randomized controlled trials have shown that tea can improve cardiovascular disease risk factors. We have previously reported a non-caffeine associated beneficial effect of regular black tea consumption on blood pressure and its variation. Objective: To explore the non-caffeine associated effects of black tea on body weight and body fat distribution, and cardiovascular disease related metabolic outcomes. Design: regular tea-drinking men and women (n = 111; BMI 20–35 kg m−2) were recruited to a randomized controlled double-blind 6 month parallel-designed trial. Participants consumed 3 cups per day of either powdered black tea solids (tea) or a flavonoid-free flavour- and caffeine-matched placebo (control). Body weight, waist- and hip-circumference, endothelial function and plasma biomarkers were assessed at baseline, 3 months and 6 months. Results: Compared to control, regular ingestion of black tea over 3 months inhibited weight gain (−0.64 kg, p = 0.047) and reduced waist circumference (−1.88 cm, P = 0.035) and waist-to-hip ratio (−0.03, P = 0.005). These effects were no longer significant at 6 months. There were no significant effects observed on fasting glucose, insulin, plasma lipids or endothelial function. Conclusion: Our study suggests that short-term regular ingestion of black tea over 3 months can improve body weight and body fat distribution, compared to a caffeine-matched control beverage. However, there was no evidence that these effects were sustained beyond 3 months.

Graphical abstract: Effects of black tea on body composition and metabolic outcomes related to cardiovascular disease risk: a randomized controlled trial

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
12 Mar 2014
Accepted
12 May 2014
First published
12 May 2014

This article is Open Access

Food Funct., 2014,5, 1613-1620
Article type
Paper
Author version available

Effects of black tea on body composition and metabolic outcomes related to cardiovascular disease risk: a randomized controlled trial

S. K. Bøhn, K. D. Croft, S. Burrows, I. B. Puddey, T. P. J. Mulder, D. Fuchs, R. J. Woodman and J. M. Hodgson, Food Funct., 2014, 5, 1613
DOI: 10.1039/C4FO00209A

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