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Issue 31, 2013
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Hydrogen-bonds in molecular solids – from biological systems to organic electronics

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Abstract

Hydrogen-bonding (H-bonding) is a relatively strong, highly directional, and specific noncovalent interaction present in many organic molecules, and notably is responsible for supramolecular ordering in biological systems. The H-bonding interactions play a role in many organic electrically conducting materials – in particular in those related to biology, e.g. melanin and indigo. This article aims to highlight recent work on application of nature-inspired H-bonded organic molecules in organic electronic devices. Three topics are covered in this brief review: (1) electrical and ionic conduction in natural H-bonded systems, (2) semiconducting properties of H-bonded organic pigments, and (3) exploitation of H-bonding for supramolecular assembly of organic conductors. H-bonding interactions are ubiquitous in biology, thus making the study of H-bonded organic semiconductors highly pertinent where interfacing of electronics with biological systems is desired.

Graphical abstract: Hydrogen-bonds in molecular solids – from biological systems to organic electronics

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Article information


Submitted
10 Feb 2013
Accepted
27 Feb 2013
First published
27 Feb 2013

This article is Open Access

J. Mater. Chem. B, 2013,1, 3742-3753
Article type
Feature Article

Hydrogen-bonds in molecular solids – from biological systems to organic electronics

E. D. Głowacki, M. Irimia-Vladu, S. Bauer and N. S. Sariciftci, J. Mater. Chem. B, 2013, 1, 3742
DOI: 10.1039/C3TB20193G

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