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Issue 10, 2013

The chromium in timberline forests in the eastern Tibetan Plateau

Author affiliations

Abstract

In order to study the regional distribution, trait and possible source of chromium in the eastern Tibetan Plateau, we collected samples of xylem, bark, leaves and twigs in two parallel northwest–southeast belt transects (TA and TB) from the Hengduan Mountains. According to the Cr mean concentration, organ/tissue was split into two groups: the high-level organ/tissue (twigs: 1.476 mg kg−1) and the low-level organ/tissue (bark: 0.413 mg kg−1, leaves: 0.340 mg kg−1 and xylem: 0.194 mg kg−1). The mean Cr concentrations of twigs and leaves in TB samples were higher than those in the TA samples, and the mean Cr concentration in both sites gradually reduced from southeast to northwest. Both the southeasterly and southwesterly monsoons could be significant, influential factors in this connection. The top three mean Cr concentrations were S7, S1 and S8, which were closer to the developed city. Mean Cr concentrations in S3, S4 and S5, (remote, high mountains) were relatively low. The high mountains acting as a barrier to the monsoon and the distance from the big city may play important roles in the distribution of Chromium. Furthermore, the relationship between the mean Cr concentration and precipitation, timberline trees as bio-monitors of chromium pollution in polluted areas and the possible source of Cr in the eastern Tibetan Plateau are also discussed. This study may provide reliable proof of Cr contamination processes, and so help in future to prevent further Cr pollution, and also be helpful in understanding the important function of forest ecosystems in relation to atmospheric pollution and global change. To better understand the characteristics of temporal and spatial distribution of Cr concentration, we found that tree ring, fine roots and soil samples are good choices.

Graphical abstract: The chromium in timberline forests in the eastern Tibetan Plateau

Article information


Submitted
03 Jun 2013
Accepted
19 Aug 2013
First published
19 Aug 2013

Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013,15, 1930-1937
Article type
Paper

The chromium in timberline forests in the eastern Tibetan Plateau

J. Luo, R. Tang, J. She, Y. Chen, Y. Gong, J. Zhou and D. Yu, Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013, 15, 1930 DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00280B

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