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Issue 8, 2013
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Self-cleaning antimicrobial surfaces by bio-enabled growth of SnO2 coatings on glass

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Abstract

Conventional vapor-deposition techniques for coatings require sophisticated equipment and/or high-temperature resistant substrates. Therefore bio-inspired techniques for the fabrication of inorganic coatings have been developed in recent years. Inspired by the biology behind the formation of the intricate skeletons of diatoms orchestrated by a class of cationic polyamines (silaffins) we have used surface-bound spermine, a naturally occurring polyamine, to promote the fast deposition of homogeneous, thin and transparent biomimetic SnO2 coatings on glass surfaces. The bio-enabled SnO2 film is highly photoactive, i.e. it generates superoxide radicals (O2˙) upon sunlight exposure resulting in a strong degradation of organic contaminants and a strong antimicrobial activity. Upon illumination the biomimetic SnO2 coating exhibits a switchable amphiphilic behavior, which – in combination with its photoactivity – creates a self-cleaning surface. The intrinsic self-cleaning properties could lead to the development of new protective, antifouling coatings on various substrates.

Graphical abstract: Self-cleaning antimicrobial surfaces by bio-enabled growth of SnO2 coatings on glass

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Publication details

The article was received on 02 Jan 2013, accepted on 22 Feb 2013 and first published on 25 Feb 2013


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C3NR00007A
Nanoscale, 2013,5, 3447-3456

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    Self-cleaning antimicrobial surfaces by bio-enabled growth of SnO2 coatings on glass

    R. André, F. Natalio, M. N. Tahir, R. Berger and W. Tremel, Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 3447
    DOI: 10.1039/C3NR00007A

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