Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 17, 2013
Previous Article Next Article

Stimuli-responsive copolymer solution and surface assemblies for biomedical applications

Author affiliations

Abstract

Stimuli-responsive polymeric materials is one of the fastest growing fields of the 21st century, with the annual number of papers published more than quadrupling in the last ten years. The responsiveness of polymer solution assemblies and surfaces to biological stimuli (e.g. pH, reduction–oxidation, enzymes, glucose) and externally applied triggers (e.g. temperature, light, solvent quality) shows particular promise for various biomedical applications including drug delivery, tissue engineering, medical diagnostics, and bioseparations. Furthermore, the integration of copolymer architectures into stimuli-responsive materials design enables exquisite control over the locations of responsive sites within self-assembled nanostructures. The combination of new synthesis techniques and well-defined copolymer self-assembly has facilitated substantial developments in stimuli-responsive materials in recent years. In this tutorial review, we discuss several methods that have been employed to synthesize self-assembling and stimuli-responsive copolymers for biomedical applications, and we identify common themes in the response mechanisms among the targeted stimuli. Additionally, we highlight parallels between the chemistries used for generating solution assemblies and those employed for creating copolymer surfaces.

Graphical abstract: Stimuli-responsive copolymer solution and surface assemblies for biomedical applications

Back to tab navigation

Article information


Submitted
13 Dec 2012
First published
13 Feb 2013

Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 7057-7071
Article type
Tutorial Review

Stimuli-responsive copolymer solution and surface assemblies for biomedical applications

E. G. Kelley, J. N. L. Albert, M. O. Sullivan and T. H. Epps, III, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 7057 DOI: 10.1039/C3CS35512H

To request permission to reproduce material from this article, please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page.

If you are an author contributing to an RSC publication, you do not need to request permission provided correct acknowledgement is given.

If you are the author of this article, you do not need to request permission to reproduce figures and diagrams provided correct acknowledgement is given. If you want to reproduce the whole article in a third-party publication (excluding your thesis/dissertation for which permission is not required) please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page.

Read more about how to correctly acknowledge RSC content.


Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements