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Issue 5, 2013
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High-throughput phenotyping of uropathogenic E. coli isolates with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

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Abstract

Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is an established rapid whole-organism fingerprinting method that generates metabolic fingerprints from bacteria that reflect the phenotype of the microorganism under investigation. However, whilst FT-IR spectroscopy is fast (typically 10 s to 1 min per sample), the approaches for microbial sample preparation can be time consuming as plate culture or shake flasks are used for growth of the organism. We report a new approach that allows micro-cultivation of bacteria from low volumes (typically 200 μL) to be coupled with FT-IR spectroscopy. This approach is fast and easy to perform and gives equivalent data to the lengthier and more expensive shake flask cultivations (sample volume = 20 mL). With this micro-culture approach we also demonstrate high reproducibility of the metabolic fingerprints. The approach allowed separation of different isolates of Escherichia coli involved in urinary tract infection, including members of the globally disseminated ST131 clone, with respect to both genotype and resistance or otherwise to the antibiotic Ciprofloxacin.

Graphical abstract: High-throughput phenotyping of uropathogenic E. coli isolates with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

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Publication details

The article was received on 18 Oct 2012, accepted on 11 Jan 2013 and first published on 11 Jan 2013


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN36517D
Analyst, 2013,138, 1363-1369

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    High-throughput phenotyping of uropathogenic E. coli isolates with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    H. AlRabiah, E. Correa, M. Upton and R. Goodacre, Analyst, 2013, 138, 1363
    DOI: 10.1039/C3AN36517D

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