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Issue 5, 2012
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Controlling the growth morphology of carbon nanotubes: from suspended bridges to upright forests

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Abstract

We have developed two strategies to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from low-density surface growth to high-density forest growth. We have demonstrated that by introducing a C2H2 pulse at the beginning of the growth, where methane is still used as the main carbon feeding gas, the growth tendency of CNTs can be changed and the resulting growth morphology will vary from surface growth to forest growth. Similarly, the growth morphology can be changed when the growth temperature is raised. The further characterization viaRaman spectroscopy indicates that an increasing C2H2 pulse time will lead to a rise of the D peak for as-grown CNTs, due to the formation of more multi-walled CNTs and the amorphous carbon contamination introduced by extra C2H2, while a high growth temperature tends to produce high-quality CNTs and to reduce the amorphous carbon contamination. Furthermore, by appropriately adjusting the growth temperature and controlling the C2H2 pulse time, we have managed to produce both suspended CNT bridges and upright forests within a single growth procedure and to form suspended pristine CNT transistors with a relatively high yield. In addition, the electrical properties of these CNT nanostructures have been investigated by electrical transport and scanning photocurrent measurements.

Graphical abstract: Controlling the growth morphology of carbon nanotubes: from suspended bridges to upright forests

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Article information


Submitted
27 Sep 2011
Accepted
12 Jan 2012
First published
09 Feb 2012

Nanoscale, 2012,4, 1682-1687
Article type
Paper

Controlling the growth morphology of carbon nanotubes: from suspended bridges to upright forests

Y. Cao and Y. Xu, Nanoscale, 2012, 4, 1682
DOI: 10.1039/C2NR11405D

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