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Issue 9, 2011
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Organic semiconductor for artificial photosynthesis: water splitting into hydrogen by a bioinspired C3N3S3polymer under visible light irradiation

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Abstract

A novel organic semiconductor photocatalyst mimicking natural light-harvesting antenna complexes in photosynthetic organisms, a disulfide (–S–S–) bridged C3N3S3polymer, was designed and developed to generate hydrogen from water under visible light irradiation. The artificial conjugated polymer shows high H2-producing activity from the half-reaction of water splitting without the aid of a sacrificial electron donor. The H2-producing efficiency and photo-stability of the catalyst could be improved greatly using Ru and single-wall carbon nanotubes as cocatalysts or by adding a sacrificial donor. The results represent a potential and prospective application of the C3N3S3polymer in solar energy conversion and offer significant guidance to develop more stable and efficient photocatalytic systems based on organic semiconductors.

Graphical abstract: Organic semiconductor for artificial photosynthesis: water splitting into hydrogen by a bioinspired C3N3S3polymer under visible light irradiation

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
25 Apr 2011
Accepted
08 Jun 2011
First published
24 Jun 2011

Chem. Sci., 2011,2, 1826-1830
Article type
Edge Article

Organic semiconductor for artificial photosynthesis: water splitting into hydrogen by a bioinspired C3N3S3polymer under visible light irradiation

Z. Zhang, J. Long, L. Yang, W. Chen, W. Dai, X. Fu and X. Wang, Chem. Sci., 2011, 2, 1826
DOI: 10.1039/C1SC00257K

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