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Issue 18, 2011
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Short range ballistic motion in fluid lipid bilayers studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering

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Abstract

Diffusion is the primary mechanism for movement of lipids and proteins in the lateral direction of a biological membrane. In this paper we have used quasi-elastic neutron scattering to examine the diffusion process of lipid molecules in fluid DMPC membranes. We found that the motion over length scales greater than the lipid diameter could be characterized as a continuous diffusion process, with a diffusion coefficient of D = 64 × 10−12 m2/s. The continuous diffusion model has been successfully used in the past to describe the motion of lipid over long length scales. However, the focus of this measurement was to determine how the character of the molecular motion changes on length scales shorter than the nearest neighbour distance. At very short length scales (<2.37 Å), we see first experimental evidence for a short-range flow-like ballistic motion.

Graphical abstract: Short range ballistic motion in fluid lipid bilayers studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
18 Apr 2011
Accepted
07 Jul 2011
First published
05 Aug 2011

Soft Matter, 2011,7, 8358-8362
Article type
Paper

Short range ballistic motion in fluid lipid bilayers studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering

C. L. Armstrong, M. Trapp, J. Peters, T. Seydel and M. C. Rheinstädter, Soft Matter, 2011, 7, 8358
DOI: 10.1039/C1SM05691C

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