Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 5, 2011
Previous Article Next Article

Nanoprecipitation and nanoformulation of polymers: from history to powerful possibilities beyond poly(lactic acid)

Author affiliations

Abstract

Nanoprecipitation is a facile, mild, and low energy input process for the preparation of polymeric nanoparticles. Basic requirements, as well as common techniques for the self-assembly of non-charged and non-amphiphilic macromolecules into defined nanoparticles are described. At present, the primary focus of polymer nanoprecipitation research lays on poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and its copolymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). This contribution thus emphasises on polymers beyond PLA systems, such as common industrial- or tailored lab-made polymers, and their ability to form well-defined, functional nanoparticles for a variety of applications now and in the past two centuries. Moreover, in combination with high-throughput devices such as microfluidics, pipetting robots, inkjet printers, and automated analytical instrumentation, the abilities of nanoprecipitation may broaden tremendously with significant effects on new applications.

Graphical abstract: Nanoprecipitation and nanoformulation of polymers: from history to powerful possibilities beyond poly(lactic acid)

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 25 Aug 2010, accepted on 01 Oct 2010 and first published on 05 Nov 2010


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0SM00862A
Soft Matter, 2011,7, 1581-1588

  •   Request permissions

    Nanoprecipitation and nanoformulation of polymers: from history to powerful possibilities beyond poly(lactic acid)

    S. Schubert, J. T. Delaney, Jr and U. S. Schubert, Soft Matter, 2011, 7, 1581
    DOI: 10.1039/C0SM00862A

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements