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Issue 5, 2010
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Automated synthesis of phosphorus–sulfur analogs of nucleic acids—25 years on: potential therapeutic agents and proven utility in biotechnology

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Abstract

Replacement of non-bridging oxygen by sulfur in one or more internucleotide linkages in synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) was first fully automated in 1984. The present account highlights how ready access to these nuclease-resistant, phosphorothioate-modified oligodeoxynucleotides (PS-ODNs) and chemically related compounds, notably phosphorothiolates, has enabled remarkably broad advances across basic science, medical research, and biotechnology. These developments exemplify how an initially narrow-scope chemical reaction—in this case, automated sulfurization of an internucleoside phosphite—can give rise to diverse applications far beyond initial expectations.

Graphical abstract: Automated synthesis of phosphorus–sulfur analogs of nucleic acids—25 years on: potential therapeutic agents and proven utility in biotechnology

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Article information


Submitted
17 Oct 2009
Accepted
04 Jan 2010
First published
18 Feb 2010

New J. Chem., 2010,34, 795-804
Article type
Perspective

Automated synthesis of phosphorus–sulfur analogs of nucleic acids—25 years on: potential therapeutic agents and proven utility in biotechnology

G. Zon, New J. Chem., 2010, 34, 795
DOI: 10.1039/B9NJ00577C

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