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Issue 4, 2010
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The extraction of liquid, protein molecules and yeast cells from paper through surface acoustic wave atomization

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Abstract

Paper has been proposed as an inexpensive and versatile carrier for microfluidics devices with abilities well beyond simple capillary action for pregnancy tests and the like. Unlike standard microfluidics devices, extracting a fluid from the paper is a challenge and a drawback to its broader use. Here, we extract fluid from narrow paper strips using surface acoustic wave (SAW) irradiation that subsequently atomizes the extracted fluid into a monodisperse aerosol for use in mass spectroscopy, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery applications. Two protein molecules, ovalbumin and bovine serum albumin (BSA), have been preserved in paper and then extracted using atomized mist through SAW excitation; protein electrophoresis shows there is less than 1% degradation of either protein molecule in this process. Finally, a solution of live yeast cells was infused into paper, which was subsequently dried for preservation then remoistened to extract the cells via SAW atomization, yielding live cells at the completion of the process. The successful preservation and extraction of fluids, proteins and yeast cells significantly expands the usefulness of paper in microfluidics.

Graphical abstract: The extraction of liquid, protein molecules and yeast cells from paper through surface acoustic wave atomization

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
04 Aug 2009
Accepted
16 Oct 2009
First published
01 Dec 2009

Lab Chip, 2010,10, 470-476
Article type
Paper

The extraction of liquid, protein molecules and yeast cells from paper through surface acoustic wave atomization

A. Qi, L. Yeo, J. Friend and J. Ho, Lab Chip, 2010, 10, 470
DOI: 10.1039/B915833B

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