Jump to main content
Jump to site search
Access to RSC content Close the message box

Continue to access RSC content when you are not at your institution. Follow our step-by-step guide.


Issue 4, 2009
Previous Article Next Article

Structure and function revealed with submolecular resolution at the liquid–solid interface

Author affiliations

Abstract

The liquid–solid interface is a unique medium to support the self-assembly of molecules into surface-confined networks. Non-covalent interactions are key in forming these two-dimensional (2D) architectures, and a deep understanding is crucial for successful 2D crystal engineering. Scanning tunnelling microscopy is the tool of choice to reveal the structure and function of these patterns with subnanometre resolution. A recent success is the formation of 2D nanoporous molecular patterns and their host–guest chemistry. However, this is not the only functionality addressed by this review. Surface-confined molecular architectures at the liquid–solid interface are also relevant in the field of molecular electronics. Furthermore, inducing and probing chemical reactivity at the single-molecule level at the liquid–solid interface might turn out to be one of the most exciting developments.

Graphical abstract: Structure and function revealed with submolecular resolution at the liquid–solid interface

Back to tab navigation

Article information


Submitted
30 Jun 2008
Accepted
30 Oct 2008
First published
09 Dec 2008

Soft Matter, 2009,5, 721-735
Article type
Review Article

Structure and function revealed with submolecular resolution at the liquid–solid interface

J. A. A. W. Elemans and S. De Feyter, Soft Matter, 2009, 5, 721
DOI: 10.1039/B811090E

Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements