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Issue 8, 2009
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Metal–organic framework structures – how closely are they related to classical inorganic structures?

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Abstract

Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as an important family of compounds for which new properties are increasingly being found. The potential for such compounds appears to be immense, especially in catalysis, sorption and separation processes. In order to appreciate the properties and to design newer frameworks it is necessary to understand the structures from a fundamental perspective. The use of node, net and vertex symbols has helped in simplifying some of the complex MOF structures. Many MOF structures are beginning to be described as derived from inorganic structures. In this tutorial review, we have provided the basics of the node, the net and the vertex symbols and have explained some of the MOF structures. In addition, we have also attempted to provide some leads towards designing newer structures/topologies.

Graphical abstract: Metal–organic framework structures – how closely are they related to classical inorganic structures?

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Publication details

The article was received on 02 Feb 2009 and first published on 09 Jun 2009


Article type: Tutorial Review
DOI: 10.1039/B815106G
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2009,38, 2304-2318

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    Metal–organic framework structures – how closely are they related to classical inorganic structures?

    S. Natarajan and P. Mahata, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2009, 38, 2304
    DOI: 10.1039/B815106G

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