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Issue 9, 2008
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Time-resolved methods in biophysics. 7. Photon counting vs. analog time-resolved singlet oxygen phosphorescence detection

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Abstract

Two recent advances in optoelectronics, namely novel near-IR sensitive photomultipliers and inexpensive yet powerful diode-pumped solid-state lasers working at kHz repetition rate, enable the time-resolved detection of singlet oxygen (O2(a1Δg)) phosphorescence in photon counting mode, thereby boosting the time-resolution, sensitivity, and dynamic range of this well-established detection technique. Principles underlying this novel approach and selected examples of applications are provided in this perspective, which illustrate the advantages over the conventional analog detection mode.

Graphical abstract: Time-resolved methods in biophysics. 7. Photon counting vs. analog time-resolved singlet oxygen phosphorescence detection

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Article information


Submitted
13 Mar 2008
Accepted
09 May 2008
First published
25 Jun 2008

Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2008,7, 1003-1010
Article type
Perspective

Time-resolved methods in biophysics. 7. Photon counting vs. analog time-resolved singlet oxygen phosphorescence detection

A. Jiménez-Banzo, X. Ragàs, P. Kapusta and S. Nonell, Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2008, 7, 1003
DOI: 10.1039/B804333G

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