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Issue 8, 2007
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Wormlike micelles: where do we stand? Recent developments, linear rheology and scattering techniques

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Abstract

Wormlike micelles are elongated flexible self-assembly structures formed by the aggregation of amphiphiles. Above a threshold concentration, they entangle into a dynamic network, reminiscent of polymer solutions, and display remarkable visco-elastic properties, which have been exploited in numerous industrial and technological fields. Relating the microstructure of these intricate structures with their bulk properties is still an ongoing quest. In this review, we present a classification of wormlike micelles, with a focus on novel systems and applications. We describe the current state of understanding of their linear rheology and give a detailed account of recent progress in small-angle neutron scattering, a particularly powerful technique to elucidate their microstructure on a wide range of length-scales.

Graphical abstract: Wormlike micelles: where do we stand? Recent developments, linear rheology and scattering techniques

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Article information


Submitted
16 Apr 2007
Accepted
04 Jun 2007
First published
26 Jun 2007

Soft Matter, 2007,3, 956-970
Article type
Review Article

Wormlike micelles: where do we stand? Recent developments, linear rheology and scattering techniques

C. A. Dreiss, Soft Matter, 2007, 3, 956
DOI: 10.1039/B705775J

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