Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 8, 2006
Previous Article Next Article

Light-regulated release of liposomes from phospholipid membranes via photoresponsive polymer–DNA conjugates

Author affiliations

Abstract

A method for releasing tethered liposomes from a supported lipid bilayer in response to a light stimulus is described. The tethering is accomplished through the hybridization of end-functionalized DNA that resides on both the supported lipid bilayer and liposome surfaces. Normally consisting of cholesterol or lipid tails, the end group is replaced in this study by a photoresponsive polymer that partitions into lipid bilayers at physiological pH. When exposed to UV light, it undergoes excited state proton transfer with water. The ensuing increase in polarity increases the solubility of the polymer in the aqueous phase. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to record both the construction of the vesicle assembly and the subsequent response to UV light. It is found that the critical flow rate for vesicle release is reduced when buffer flow is performed in conjunction with UV exposure.

Graphical abstract: Light-regulated release of liposomes from phospholipid membranes via photoresponsive polymer–DNA conjugates

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
02 May 2006
Accepted
21 Jun 2006
First published
03 Jul 2006

Soft Matter, 2006,2, 710-715
Article type
Paper

Light-regulated release of liposomes from phospholipid membranes via photoresponsive polymer–DNA conjugates

J. J. Benkoski, A. Jesorka, M. Edvardsson and F. Höök, Soft Matter, 2006, 2, 710
DOI: 10.1039/B606123K

Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements