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Issue 43, 2006
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Ordered 2-D and 3-D nanostructured amphiphile self-assembly materials stable in excess solvent

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Abstract

Amphiphile lyotropic liquid crystalline self-assembly materials are being used for a diverse range of applications. Historically, the most studied lyotropic liquid crystalline phase is probably the one-dimensional (1-D) lamellar phase, which has been employed as a model system for biomembranes and for drug delivery applications. In recent years, the structurally more complex 2-D and 3-D ordered lyotropic liquid crystalline phases, of which reversed hexagonal (H2) and reversed cubic phases (v2) are two prominent examples, have received growing interest. As is the case for the lamellar phase, these phases are frequently stable in excess water, which facilitates the preparation of nanoparticle dispersions and makes them suitable candidates for the encapsulation and controlled release of drugs. Integral membrane protein crystallization media and templates for the synthesis of inorganic nanostructured materials are other applications for 2-D and 3-D amphiphile self-assembly materials. The number of amphiphiles identified as forming nanostructured reversed phases stable in excess solvent is rapidly growing. In this article, different classes of amphiphiles that form reversed phases in excess solvent are reviewed, with an emphasis on linking phase behavior to amphiphile structure. The different amphiphile classes include: ethylene oxide-, monoacylglycerol-, glycolipid-, phosphatidylethanolamine-, and urea-based amphiphiles.

Graphical abstract: Ordered 2-D and 3-D nanostructured amphiphile self-assembly materials stable in excess solvent

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Publication details

The article was received on 04 Jul 2006, accepted on 05 Sep 2006 and first published on 10 Oct 2006


Article type: Invited Article
DOI: 10.1039/B609510K
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2006,8, 4957-4975

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    Ordered 2-D and 3-D nanostructured amphiphile self-assembly materials stable in excess solvent

    T. Kaasgaard and C. J. Drummond, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2006, 8, 4957
    DOI: 10.1039/B609510K

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