Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 3, 1981
Previous Article Next Article

Kerr effect in water + dioxan solutions

Abstract

The Kerr constants, densities and refractive indices of the water + dioxan mixture over the whole composition range are reported. The molar Kerr constant of H2O extrapolated to infinite dilution in dioxan is found to be ∞(mK2)= 2.3 × 10–27 C2 m5 J–2. The components of the polarizability tensor of H2O are calculated by two approaches, using light scattering data and a bond additivity method. Both give the same result within experimental error: αxx= 1.69 ± 0.04, αyy= 1.9 ± 0.2, αzz= 1.3 ± 0.2 (in units 10–40 C2 m2 J–1), where x is the dipolar axis and z is normal to the molecular plane. The Kerr effect over the whole composition range is interpreted according to a theory of Hasted, proposed for the dielectric polarization of organic + aqueous mixtures. We find that the structure of water increases on addition of dioxan up to xD= 0.2, xD being the mole fraction of dioxan, and then decrease, in apparent contradiction to the results from dielectric polarization which indicate a monotonic decrease in the structure of the water + dioxan mixture.

Back to tab navigation

Article information


J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans. 2, 1981,77, 495-501
Article type
Paper

Kerr effect in water + dioxan solutions

G. Khanarian and L. Kent, J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans. 2, 1981, 77, 495 DOI: 10.1039/F29817700495

To request permission to reproduce material from this article, please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page.

If you are an author contributing to an RSC publication, you do not need to request permission provided correct acknowledgement is given.

If you are the author of this article, you do not need to request permission to reproduce figures and diagrams provided correct acknowledgement is given. If you want to reproduce the whole article in a third-party publication (excluding your thesis/dissertation for which permission is not required) please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page.

Read more about how to correctly acknowledge RSC content.


Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements