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Themed collection Lab on a Chip Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureship winners

14 items
Open Access Paper

On-chip functional neuroimaging with mechanical stimulation in Caenorhabditis elegans larvae for studying development and neural circuits

New designs of microfluidic devices can facilitate recording of C. elegans larvae neuronal responses to precise mechanical stimuli, which reveal new understanding of development of mechanosensory neurons and circuits.

Graphical abstract: On-chip functional neuroimaging with mechanical stimulation in Caenorhabditis elegans larvae for studying development and neural circuits
From the themed collection: Recent Open Access Articles
Paper

Biophysical isolation and identification of circulating tumor cells

The integrated vortex enrichment–deformability cytometry device may enable automated enumeration of circulating tumor cells from blood by mechanophenotyping.

Graphical abstract: Biophysical isolation and identification of circulating tumor cells
Paper

A vascularized and perfused organ-on-a-chip platform for large-scale drug screening applications

A vascularized, perfused organ-on-a-chip platform suitable for large-scale drug efficacy/toxicity screening.

Graphical abstract: A vascularized and perfused organ-on-a-chip platform for large-scale drug screening applications
From the themed collection: Organ-, body- and disease-on-a-chip systems
Paper

An inkjet printed, roll-coated digital microfluidic device for inexpensive, miniaturized diagnostic assays

Inkjet printing is combined with roll-coating to fabricate digital microfluidic (DMF) devices outside of the cleanroom for inexpensive, miniaturized diagnostic assays, with straightforward scalability towards mass production.

Graphical abstract: An inkjet printed, roll-coated digital microfluidic device for inexpensive, miniaturized diagnostic assays
Paper

Bioprinted thrombosis-on-a-chip

A novel bioprinted model of thrombosis was developed to study thrombosis and thrombolysis in vitro.

Graphical abstract: Bioprinted thrombosis-on-a-chip
From the themed collection: Organ-, body- and disease-on-a-chip systems
Paper

Engineering a perfusable 3D human liver platform from iPS cells

The authors present a human liver model that supports both primary hepatocytes and human iHeps with flexibility for systems integration.

Graphical abstract: Engineering a perfusable 3D human liver platform from iPS cells
Paper

Wash-free magnetic immunoassay of the PSA cancer marker using SERS and droplet microfluidics

We report a novel wash-free magnetic immunoassay technique for prostate-specific antigen that uses a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-based microdroplet sensor.

Graphical abstract: Wash-free magnetic immunoassay of the PSA cancer marker using SERS and droplet microfluidics
Paper

Surface-tension driven open microfluidic platform for hanging droplet culture

A hanging droplet culture platform enabling culture of shear-sensitive and suspension cells with a high degree of accessibility to culture.

Graphical abstract: Surface-tension driven open microfluidic platform for hanging droplet culture
Paper

A cost-effective fluorescence mini-microscope for biomedical applications

A miniature microscope was designed and fabricated with built-in fluorescence capability for biomedical applications.

Graphical abstract: A cost-effective fluorescence mini-microscope for biomedical applications
Open Access Paper

Photopatterned oil-reservoir micromodels with tailored wetting properties

We present a new method to fabricate oil-reservoir micromodels with heterogeneous wetting properties.

Graphical abstract: Photopatterned oil-reservoir micromodels with tailored wetting properties
Paper

Whole blood human neutrophil trafficking in a microfluidic model of infection and inflammation

Inflammation on a chip.

Graphical abstract: Whole blood human neutrophil trafficking in a microfluidic model of infection and inflammation
Paper

Microfluidic serial digital to analog pressure converter for arbitrary pressure generation and contamination-free flow control

Microfluidic serial digital to analog pressure converter can generate arbitrary analog pressures on-chip for real time, automated flow control.

Graphical abstract: Microfluidic serial digital to analog pressure converter for arbitrary pressure generation and contamination-free flow control
Paper

Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing by tracking single cell growth in a microfluidic agarose channel system

We demonstrate a microfluidic agarose channel system that uses agarose as a fixation material of bacteria and reduces the time taken for antibiotic susceptibility testing.

Graphical abstract: Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing by tracking single cell growth in a microfluidic agarose channel system
Paper

Immuno-pillar chip: a new platform for rapid and easy-to-use immunoassay

We present a new rapid and easy-to-use immunoassay chip which we have named the immuno-pillar chip. It has hydrogel pillars, fabricated inside a microchannel, with many antibody molecules immobilized onto 1 µm diameter polystyrene beads.

Graphical abstract: Immuno-pillar chip: a new platform for rapid and easy-to-use immunoassay
From the themed collection: 10th Anniversary Issue: Japan
14 items

About this collection

Collection of papers authored by winners of the Lab on a Chip Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureship. Nominations open in spring each year and winners are announced in late summer. The winners give a lecture at the annual MicroTAS conference.

2019 winner: Professor  Hang Lu, Georgia Tech, USA 

2019 winner profile: Professor Hang Lu is the Love Family Professor, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA.

Professor Lu earned her PhD in Chemical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA in 2003. After a postdoctoral fellowship with Professor Cornelia I. Bargmann, at University of California San Francisco and the Rockefeller University, she was appointed as an Assistant Professor at School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. In recognition of her outstanding achievements, Professor Lu has received numerous awards and international recognition, including being invited to join Board of Directors, Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society, invited to present at the Nobel Symposium on Microfluidics (2017) and the National Academy of Sciences’ Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposia (2014, 2012, 2009), awarded the ACS Analytical Chemistry Young Innovator Award, Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society (2013), Council of Systems Biology in Boston (CSB2) Prize in Systems Biology (2011), a National Science Foundation CAREER award (2010), an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship (2009), a DARPA Young Faculty Award (2007), a DuPont Young Professor Award (2006), the Saville Lectureship of Princeton University (2013), the H. C. Van Ness Award Lectures of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (2011), and is a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and  a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She has authored more than 140 peer-reviewed publications and has served on the Editorial Board of Lab on a Chip as Associate Editor since 2017. She is currently the director of the Interdisciplinary Bioengineering Program, and the associate director of the NSF-Simons Foundation supported Southeast Center for Mathematics and Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology.

Professor Lu has pioneered the use of microfluidic systems for imaging and performing genetic studies with small organisms, primarily the nematode C. elegans. In a series of studies published since 2008 she established a set of technologies to streamline imaging, phenotyping, and sorting of C. elegans based on features that are difficult to distinguish and discern by human eyes. The throughput of these technologies were often 1,000 times that of conventional approaches. Professor Lu’s technology has enable faster and more accurate experiments and revolutionized how genetic screens and high-content imaging experiments are done currently in other scientists’ labs. In parallel, her lab has also engineered micro systems for high-content experiments with cells, aggregates, organoids, and embryos to extract high-dimensional information for systems biology studies.

The Lu group performs research at the interface of engineering and biology. They engineer automated microfluidic systems, microscopy tools, and image imformatic technologies to address questions in neuroscience, cell biology, and biotechnology that are difficult to answer using conventional techniques. Applied to the study of fundamental biological questions, these new techniques allow the Lu group to gather large-scale quantitative data about complex systems.

Learn about the Lu group online

2018: Professor Sunghoon Kwon, Seoul National University, South Korea

2017: Professor Aaron Wheeler, University of Toronto, Canada

2016: Professor Daniel Irimia, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA

2015: Professor Dino Di Carlo, University of California, Los Angeles, USA

2014: Professor Sangeeta N. Bhatia, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

2013: Professor Shuichi Takayama, University of Michigan, USA

2012: Professor Andrew deMello, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

2011: Professor Ali Khademhosseini, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

2010: Professor Stephen Quake, Stanford University, USA

2009: Professor Abe Lee, University of California, Irvine, USA

2008: Dr Patrick Doyle, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

2007: Dr Manabu Tokeshi, Nagoya University, Japan

2006: Dr David Beebe, University of Wisconsin, USA

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