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Issue 38, 2016
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Blast wave attenuation in liquid foams: role of gas and evidence of an optimal bubble size

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Abstract

Liquid foams are excellent systems to mitigate pressure waves such as acoustic or blast waves. The understanding of the underlying dissipation mechanisms however still remains an active matter of debate. In this paper, we investigate the attenuation of a weak blast wave by a liquid foam. The wave is produced with a shock tube and impacts a foam, with a cylindrical geometry. We measure the wave attenuation and velocity in the foam as a function of bubble size, liquid fraction, and the nature of the gas. We show that the attenuation depends on the nature of the gas and we experimentally evidence a maximum of dissipation for a given bubble size. All features are qualitatively captured by a model based on thermal dissipation in the gas.

Graphical abstract: Blast wave attenuation in liquid foams: role of gas and evidence of an optimal bubble size

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Publication details

The article was received on 03 Jun 2016, accepted on 19 Aug 2016 and first published on 24 Aug 2016


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C6SM01281G
Citation: Soft Matter, 2016,12, 8015-8024

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    Blast wave attenuation in liquid foams: role of gas and evidence of an optimal bubble size

    M. Monloubou, M. A. Bruning, A. Saint-Jalmes, B. Dollet and I. Cantat, Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 8015
    DOI: 10.1039/C6SM01281G

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