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Issue 24, 2019
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Stabilizing the active phase of iron-based Fischer–Tropsch catalysts for lower olefins: mechanism and strategy

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Abstract

Fischer–Tropsch synthesis of lower olefins (FTO) is a classical yet modern topic of great significance in which the supported Fe-based nanoparticles are the most promising catalysts. The performance deterioration of catalysts is a big challenge due to the instability of the nanosized active phase of iron carbides. Herein, by in situ mass spectrometry, theoretical analysis, and atmospheric- and high-pressure experimental examinations, we revealed the Ostwald-ripening-like growth mechanism of the active phase of iron carbides in FTO, which involves the cyclic formation–decomposition of iron carbonyl intermediates to transport iron species from small particles to large ones. Accordingly, by suppressing the formation of iron carbonyl species with a high-N-content carbon support, the size and structure of the active phase were regulated and stabilized, and durable iron-based catalysts were conveniently obtained with the highest selectivity for lower olefins up to 54.1%. This study provides a practical strategy for exploring advanced FTO catalysts.

Graphical abstract: Stabilizing the active phase of iron-based Fischer–Tropsch catalysts for lower olefins: mechanism and strategy

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
12 Mar 2019
Accepted
20 May 2019
First published
20 May 2019

This article is Open Access
All publication charges for this article have been paid for by the Royal Society of Chemistry

Chem. Sci., 2019,10, 6083-6090
Article type
Edge Article

Stabilizing the active phase of iron-based Fischer–Tropsch catalysts for lower olefins: mechanism and strategy

O. Zhuo, L. Yang, F. Gao, B. Xu, Q. Wu, Y. Fan, Y. Zhang, Y. Jiang, R. Huang, X. Wang and Z. Hu, Chem. Sci., 2019, 10, 6083
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC01210A

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