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Issue 34, 2018
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A simple, label-free, electrochemical DNA parity generator/checker for error detection during data transmission based on “aptamer-nanoclaw”-modulated protein steric hindrance

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Abstract

Versatile DNA logic devices have exhibited magical power in molecular-level computing and data processing. During any type of data transmission, the appearance of erroneous bits (which have severe impacts on normal computing) is unavoidable. Luckily, the erroneous bits can be detected via placing a parity generator (pG) at the sending module and a parity checker (pC) at the receiving module. However, all current DNA pG/pC systems use optical signals as outputs. In comparison, sensitive, facilely operated, electric-powered electrochemical outputs possess inherent advantages in terms of potential practicability and future integration with semiconductor transistors. Herein, taking an even pG/pC as a model device, we construct the first electrochemical DNA pG/pC system so far. Innovatively, a thrombin aptamer is integrated into the input-strand and it functions as a “nanoclaw” to selectively capture thrombin; the electrochemical impedance changes induced by the “nanoclaw/thrombin” complex are used as label-free outputs. Notably, this system is simple and can be operated within 2 h, which is comparable with previous fluorescent ones, but avoids the high-cost labeled-fluorophore and tedious nanoquencher. Moreover, taking non-interfering poly-T strands as additional inputs, a cascade logic circuit (OR-2 to 1 encoder) and a parity checker that could distinguish even/odd numbers from natural numbers (0 to 9) is also achieved based on the same system. This work not only opens up inspiring horizons for the design of novel electrochemical functional devices and complicated logic circuits, but also lays a solid foundation for potential logic-programmed target detection.

Graphical abstract: A simple, label-free, electrochemical DNA parity generator/checker for error detection during data transmission based on “aptamer-nanoclaw”-modulated protein steric hindrance

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Publication details

The article was received on 06 Jun 2018, accepted on 15 Jul 2018 and first published on 19 Jul 2018


Article type: Edge Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC02482K
Citation: Chem. Sci., 2018,9, 6981-6987
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    A simple, label-free, electrochemical DNA parity generator/checker for error detection during data transmission based on “aptamer-nanoclaw”-modulated protein steric hindrance

    D. Fan, Y. Fan, E. Wang and S. Dong, Chem. Sci., 2018, 9, 6981
    DOI: 10.1039/C8SC02482K

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