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Issue 12, 2011
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Molecular recognition of cytochrome c by designed receptors for generation of in vivo and in vitro functions

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Abstract

Cytochrome c is a common guest in biological protein recognition processes and works not as an enzyme, but as an electron carrier in biological respiration. Although this is a relatively small protein, its structure is too complicated to be easily recognized by common synthetic receptors. This review is an overview of the molecular recognition of cytochrome c by synthetic receptors and highlights two examples exhibiting in vivo and in vitro non-biological functions: (i) crown ether receptors effectively interact with cationic residues via multiple crown ether complexations and (ii) dendrimer receptors strongly bind with a negatively charged patch via complementary electrostatic interactions. These designed receptors offer effective cytochrome c recognition to generate non-biological catalytic activity and in cell functions.

Graphical abstract: Molecular recognition of cytochrome c by designed receptors for generation of in vivo and in vitro functions

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Article information


Submitted
19 Mar 2011
Accepted
27 Jun 2011
First published
21 Jul 2011

Chem. Sci., 2011,2, 2301-2305
Article type
Minireview

Molecular recognition of cytochrome c by designed receptors for generation of in vivo and in vitro functions

S. Shinoda and H. Tsukube, Chem. Sci., 2011, 2, 2301
DOI: 10.1039/C1SC00162K

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