Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 2, 2016

The nature of students' chemical reasoning employed in scientific argumentation in physical chemistry

Author affiliations

Abstract

Recent science education reform efforts have emphasized scientific practices in addition to scientific knowledge. Less work has been done at the tertiary level to consider students' engagement in scientific practices. In this work, we consider physical chemistry students' engagement in argumentation and construction of causal explanations. Students in two POGIL physical chemistry classrooms were videotaped as they engaged in discourse while solving thermodynamics problems. Videos were transcribed and transcripts were analyzed using the Toulmin Argument Pattern (TAP). Arguments were then characterized using the modes of reasoning in a learning progression on chemical thinking (CTLP) (Sevian and Talanquer, 2014). Results showed that students used primarily relational reasoning, in which no causal explanation is generated, rather a single relationship between variables was used to justify a claim. We discuss all types of reasoning present in students' arguments.

Article information


Submitted
16 Nov 2015
Accepted
02 Feb 2016
First published
02 Feb 2016

Chem. Educ. Res. Pract., 2016,17, 353-364
Article type
Paper
Author version available

The nature of students' chemical reasoning employed in scientific argumentation in physical chemistry

A. Moon, C. Stanford, R. Cole and M. Towns, Chem. Educ. Res. Pract., 2016, 17, 353 DOI: 10.1039/C5RP00207A

To request permission to reproduce material from this article, please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page.

If you are an author contributing to an RSC publication, you do not need to request permission provided correct acknowledgement is given.

If you are the author of this article, you do not need to request permission to reproduce figures and diagrams provided correct acknowledgement is given. If you want to reproduce the whole article in a third-party publication (excluding your thesis/dissertation for which permission is not required) please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page.

Read more about how to correctly acknowledge RSC content.


Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements