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Issue 56, 2019
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Cyanobacterial promoted enrichment of rare earth elements europium, samarium and neodymium and intracellular europium particle formation

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Abstract

In the recovery of rare earth elements (REE) microbial biosorption has shown its theoretical ability as an extremely economically and environmentally friendly production method in the last few years. To evaluate the ability of two cyanobacterial strains, namely Anabaena spec. and Anabaena cylindrica to enrich dissolved trivalent REE, a simple protocol was followed. The REE tested in this study include some of the most prominent representatives, such as europium (Eu), samarium (Sm) and neodymium (Nd). Within the experiments, a fast decrease of the REE3+ concentration in solution was tracked by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It revealed an almost complete (>99%) biosorption of REE3+ within the first hour after the addition of metal salts. REE3+ uptake by biomass was checked using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and showed that all three selected REE3+ species were enriched in the cyanobacterial biomass and the process is assigned to a biosorption process. Although the biomass stayed alive during the experiments, up to that, a distinction whether the REE3+ was intra- or extracellularly sorbed was not possible, since biosorption is a metabolism independent process which occurs on living as well as non-living biomass. For europium it was shown by TEM that electron dense particles, presumably europium particles with particle sizes of about 15 nm, are located inside the vegetative cyanobacterial cells. This gave clear evidence that Eu3+ was actively sorbed by living cyanobacteria. Eu3+ biosorption by cell wall precipitation due to interaction with extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) could therefore be excluded. Finally, with XRD analysis it was shown that the detected europium particles had an amorphous instead of a crystalline structure. Herein, we present a fast biosorptive enrichment of the rare earth elements europium, samarium and neodymium by Anabaena spec. and Anabaena cylindrica and for the first time the subsequent formation of intracellular europium particles by Anabaena spec.

Graphical abstract: Cyanobacterial promoted enrichment of rare earth elements europium, samarium and neodymium and intracellular europium particle formation

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
21 Aug 2019
Accepted
03 Oct 2019
First published
11 Oct 2019

This article is Open Access

RSC Adv., 2019,9, 32581-32593
Article type
Paper

Cyanobacterial promoted enrichment of rare earth elements europium, samarium and neodymium and intracellular europium particle formation

C. B. Fischer, S. Körsten, L. M. Rösken, F. Cappel, C. Beresko, G. Ankerhold, A. Schönleber, S. Geimer, D. Ecker and S. Wehner, RSC Adv., 2019, 9, 32581
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA06570A

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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