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Issue 57, 2018, Issue in Progress
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Abrasive treatment of microtiter plates improves the reproducibility of bacterial biofilm assays

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Abstract

Microtiter plate-based bacterial biofilm assay is frequently used to study bacterial biofilm development and growth. While this assay is simple and relatively high-throughput, it frequently shows difficulty in establishing robust biofilm attachment in the wells. We report that the consistency of bacterial biofilm assays carried out in microtiter plates subjected to abrasive treatment, by sandblasting or drill press grinding, is significantly improved in a Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 model. Scanning electron microscopy imaging suggests that the treated surfaces could provide points of attachment to facilitate the recruitment of bacteria in the initial phase of biofilm colony establishment. The sandblast treated polypropylene, but not polystyrene, plates were found suitable in studying the impact of flavonoid quercetin on the biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis FB17. Further investigation revealed that due to the hydrophobicity of the polystyrene surfaces, a greater amount of quercetin was adsorbed on the plate surface, effectively lowering the concentration of the flavonoid in solution.

Graphical abstract: Abrasive treatment of microtiter plates improves the reproducibility of bacterial biofilm assays

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
27 Jul 2018
Accepted
12 Sep 2018
First published
19 Sep 2018

This article is Open Access

RSC Adv., 2018,8, 32434-32439
Article type
Paper

Abrasive treatment of microtiter plates improves the reproducibility of bacterial biofilm assays

E. Bordeleau, S. A. Mazinani, D. Nguyen, F. Betancourt and H. Yan, RSC Adv., 2018, 8, 32434
DOI: 10.1039/C8RA06352D

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material and it is not used for commercial purposes.

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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