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Issue 3, 2011
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Multi-scale theoretical investigation of hydrogen storage in covalent organic frameworks

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Abstract

The quest for efficient hydrogen storage materials has been the limiting step towards the commercialization of hydrogen as an energy carrier and has attracted a lot of attention from the scientific community. Sophisticated multi-scale theoretical techniques have been considered as a valuable tool for the prediction of materials storage properties. Such techniques have also been used for the investigation of hydrogen storage in a novel category of porous materials known as Covalent Organic Frameworks (COFs). These framework materials are consisted of light elements and are characterized by exceptional physicochemical properties such as large surface areas and pore volumes. Combinations of ab initio, Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Grand Canonical Monte-Carlo (GCMC) calculations have been performed to investigate the hydrogen adsorption in these ultra-light materials. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the theoretical hydrogen storage studies that have been published after the discovery of COFs. Experimental and theoretical studies have proven that COFs have comparable or better hydrogen storage abilities than other competitive materials such as MOF. The key factors that can lead to the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of COFs are highlighted, accompanied with some recently presented theoretical multi-scale studies concerning these factors.

Graphical abstract: Multi-scale theoretical investigation of hydrogen storage in covalent organic frameworks

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Publication details

The article was received on 15 Jul 2010, accepted on 29 Oct 2010 and first published on 07 Jan 2011


Article type: Feature Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00505C
Nanoscale, 2011,3, 856-869

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    Multi-scale theoretical investigation of hydrogen storage in covalent organic frameworks

    E. Tylianakis, E. Klontzas and G. E. Froudakis, Nanoscale, 2011, 3, 856
    DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00505C

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