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Issue 10, 2020
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Amyloid hybrid membranes for bacterial & genetic material removal from water and their anti-biofouling properties

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Abstract

Water scarcity and contamination by biological pollutants are global challenges that significantly affect public health. Reverse osmosis, nanofiltration and ultrafiltration technologies are very effective for the elimination of pathogens and most contaminants but associated with considerable capital and operating costs, high energy consumption and the use of chlorinated chemicals to suppress membrane fouling. Additionally, the pressure needed by these techniques may disrupt the pathogenic microbial cell membranes, causing the release of genetic material (fragments of DNA, RNA and plasmids) into the water. Here, we introduce the simultaneous removal of both bacteria and associated genetic material using amyloid hybrid membranes, via a combined adsorption and size exclusion mechanism. Amyloid hybrid membranes can remove upto and beyond 99% of the genetic material by adsorption, where amyloid fibrils act as the primary adsorbing material. When the same membranes are surface-modified using chitosan, the anti-biofouling performance of the membranes improved significantly, with a bacterial removal efficiency exceeding 6 log.

Graphical abstract: Amyloid hybrid membranes for bacterial & genetic material removal from water and their anti-biofouling properties

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
06 Mar 2020
Accepted
03 Sep 2020
First published
11 Sep 2020

This article is Open Access

Nanoscale Adv., 2020,2, 4665-4670
Article type
Paper

Amyloid hybrid membranes for bacterial & genetic material removal from water and their anti-biofouling properties

A. Palika, A. Rahimi, S. Bolisetty, S. Handschin, P. Fischer and R. Mezzenga, Nanoscale Adv., 2020, 2, 4665
DOI: 10.1039/D0NA00189A

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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