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Issue 19, 2016
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CMOS biosensors for in vitro diagnosis – transducing mechanisms and applications

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Abstract

Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology enables low-cost and large-scale integration of transistors and physical sensing materials on tiny chips (e.g., <1 cm2), seamlessly combining the two key functions of biosensors: transducing and signal processing. Recent CMOS biosensors unified different transducing mechanisms (impedance, fluorescence, and nuclear spin) and readout electronics have demonstrated competitive sensitivity for in vitro diagnosis, such as detection of DNA (down to 10 aM), protein (down to 10 fM), or bacteria/cells (single cell). Herein, we detail the recent advances in CMOS biosensors, centering on their key principles, requisites, and applications. Together, these may contribute to the advancement of our healthcare system, which should be decentralized by broadly utilizing point-of-care diagnostic tools.

Graphical abstract: CMOS biosensors for in vitro diagnosis – transducing mechanisms and applications

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Publication details

The article was received on 05 Aug 2016, accepted on 23 Aug 2016 and first published on 09 Sep 2016


Article type: Critical Review
DOI: 10.1039/C6LC01002D
Lab Chip, 2016,16, 3664-3681
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
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    CMOS biosensors for in vitro diagnosis – transducing mechanisms and applications

    K. Lei, P. Mak, M. Law and R. P. Martins, Lab Chip, 2016, 16, 3664
    DOI: 10.1039/C6LC01002D

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