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Issue 4, 2016
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Sub-7-second genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphism by high-resolution melting curve analysis on a thermal digital microfluidic device

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Abstract

We developed a thermal digital microfluidic (T-DMF) device enabling ultrafast DNA melting curve analysis (MCA). Within 7 seconds, the T-DMF device succeeded in differentiating a melting point difference down to 1.6 °C with a variation of 0.3 °C in a tiny droplet sample (1.2 μL), which was 300 times faster and with 20 times less sample spending than the standard MCA (35 minutes, 25 μL) run in a commercial qPCR machine. Such a performance makes it possible for a rapid discrimination of single-nucleotide mutation relevant to prompt clinical decision-making. Also, aided by electronic intelligent control, the T-DMF device facilitates sample handling and pipelining in an automatic serial manner. An optimized oval-shaped thermal electrode is introduced to achieve high thermal uniformity. A device-sealing technique averts sample contamination and permits uninterrupted chemical/biological reactions. Simple fabrication using a single chromium layer fulfills both the thermal and typical transport electrode requirements. Capable of thermally modulating DNA samples with ultrafast MCA, this T-DMF device has the potential for a wide variety of life science analyses, especially for disease diagnosis and prognosis.

Graphical abstract: Sub-7-second genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphism by high-resolution melting curve analysis on a thermal digital microfluidic device

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
15 Dec 2015
Accepted
04 Jan 2016
First published
05 Jan 2016

This article is Open Access

Lab Chip, 2016,16, 743-752
Article type
Paper
Author version available

Sub-7-second genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphism by high-resolution melting curve analysis on a thermal digital microfluidic device

T. Chen, Y. Jia, C. Dong, J. Gao, P. Mak and R. P. Martins, Lab Chip, 2016, 16, 743
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC01533B

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