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Issue 20, 2015
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Electrocavitation in nanofluidics: unique phenomenon and fundamental platform

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Abstract

In this paper, we will highlight one phenomenon unique to nanofluidics: electrocavitation. Electrocavitation is defined as cavitation induced by electric fields. Cavitation in general occurs in a liquid when it is subjected to a pressure below its vapor pressure, where the liquid can break apart and form a cavity (bubble). This is frequently seen in macroscale systems, for example, rotating propeller blades on the turbines of ships or water columns in the xylem of trees. Electrocavitation in nanochannels was first reported when researchers applied electric fields within nanochannels containing electrolytes discontinuous in conductivity and found that bubbles formed within the channel. The reasons to highlight electrocavitation to both the lab-on-a-chip community and those interested in the fundamental understanding of cavitation in general are detailed below.

Graphical abstract: Electrocavitation in nanofluidics: unique phenomenon and fundamental platform

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Article information


Submitted
20 Jun 2015
Accepted
17 Aug 2015
First published
02 Sep 2015

Lab Chip, 2015,15, 3980-3983
Article type
Frontier

Electrocavitation in nanofluidics: unique phenomenon and fundamental platform

K. G. H. Janssen and S. Pennathur, Lab Chip, 2015, 15, 3980
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00692A

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