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Issue 22, 2012
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Centrifugally driven microfluidic disc for detection of chromosomal translocations

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Abstract

Chromosome translocations are a common cause of congenital disorders and cancer. Current detection methods require use of expensive and highly specialized techniques to identify the chromosome regions involved in a translocation. There is a need for rapid yet specific detection for diagnosis and prognosis of patients. In this work we demonstrate a novel, centrifugally-driven microfluidic system for controlled manipulation of oligonucleotides and subsequent detection of chromosomal translocations. The device is fabricated in the form of a disc with capillary burst microvalves employed to control the fluid flow. The microvalves in series are designed to enable fluid movement from the center towards the periphery of the disc to handle DNA sequences representing translocation between chromosome 3 and 9. The translocation detection is performed in two hybridization steps in separate sorting and detection chambers. The burst frequencies of the two capillary burst microvalves are separated by 180 rpm enabling precise control of hybridization in each of the chambers. The DNA probes targeting a translocation are immobilized directly on PMMA by a UV-activated procedure, which is compatible with the disc fabrication method. The device performance was validated by successful specific hybridization of the translocation derivatives in the sorting and detection chambers.

Graphical abstract: Centrifugally driven microfluidic disc for detection of chromosomal translocations

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Publication details

The article was received on 15 May 2012, accepted on 10 Jul 2012 and first published on 11 Jul 2012


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40554G
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 4628-4634

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    Centrifugally driven microfluidic disc for detection of chromosomal translocations

    A. L. Brøgger, D. Kwasny, F. G. Bosco, A. Silahtaroglu, Z. Tümer, A. Boisen and W. E. Svendsen, Lab Chip, 2012, 12, 4628
    DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40554G

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