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Issue 45, 2011
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Versatile fabrication of self-assembled metallic nanoparticle arrays

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Abstract

One of the challenging aspects of nanotechnology is the development of an effective and potentially universal method to place nanoparticles (NPs) into spatially well-defined, ordered, defect-free arrays. This can be achieved using “top-down” approaches, such as optical, electron beam, focused ion-beam and scanning probe lithography, or “bottom-up” approaches based on self-assembly. Here, we report the simple and rapid electrochemical generation of periodic surface defects, used to fabricate metallic NP arrays having good feature size and spacing control over a large area, without involving costly and time-consuming nanolithographic methods. Our high-throughput nanofabrication approach combines electrochemical anodization to quickly and reproducibly form a highly ordered Ta-based nanotemplate, in the form of inverted hemispherical caps (dimples), with the simplicity of thin metallic film dewetting techniques, forming a self-assembled metallic (individual metals or alloy) NP array. These can be used as nanoelectrode arrays that may have useful applications in analytical chemistry, biosensing, and electrocatalysis.

Graphical abstract: Versatile fabrication of self-assembled metallic nanoparticle arrays

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Article information


Submitted
23 Jun 2011
Accepted
29 Sep 2011
First published
19 Oct 2011

J. Mater. Chem., 2011,21, 18431-18438
Article type
Paper

Versatile fabrication of self-assembled metallic nanoparticle arrays

H. A. El-Sayed and V. I. Birss, J. Mater. Chem., 2011, 21, 18431
DOI: 10.1039/C1JM12898A

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