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Issue 1, 2010
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Suppression of breast xenograft growth and progression in nude mice: implications for the use of orally administered sphingolipids as chemopreventive agents against breast cancer

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Abstract

Sphingolipids are lipid messengers involved in the regulation of many different cellular processes. Sphingolipid enzymes and bioactive metabolites have been targets of in vitro and in vivo efforts to suppress cancer growth, progression and metastasis of various cancer types. Dietary sphingomyelin effectively suppressed colon cancer in several rodent models without causing toxic side effects. In the present study, we determined if the effect of sphingolipid metabolites derived from the hydrolysis of dietary sphingomyelin is restricted to the intestinal tract or if their systemic concentrations are sufficient to suppress cancers of distant sites. For these studies, we used MCF10AT1 cells, a model for progressive breast cancer, injected into the mammary fatpad of nude mice as a single cell suspension. The mice were fed 0.1% sphingomyelin supplements in a semi-purified AIN76A control diet when the lesions were palpable. The study was terminated when the first lesions had grown to 5 mm. In the sphingomyelin-fed group, there was a trend to smaller lesion size and, importantly, a delayed progression to more malignant stages without apparent side effects. This may be the result of significantly reduced rates of proliferation and angiogenesis, while no increase of apoptosis was detected. Changes in aberrantly expressed proteins in the sphingomyelin-fed group, such as E-cadherin, VEGF and sphingosine kinase-1, may be associated with the suppression of tumor growth. These results demonstrate that diet-derived sphingolipids can efficiently suppress the growth and progression of MCF10AT1 xenografts, suggesting that dietary sphingomyelin may also be effective against cancers of other sites.

Graphical abstract: Suppression of breast xenograft growth and progression in nude mice: implications for the use of orally administered sphingolipids as chemopreventive agents against breast cancer

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Article information


Submitted
02 Aug 2010
Accepted
28 Aug 2010
First published
23 Sep 2010

Food Funct., 2010,1, 90-98
Article type
Paper

Suppression of breast xenograft growth and progression in nude mice: implications for the use of orally administered sphingolipids as chemopreventive agents against breast cancer

K. W. Simon, L. Tait, F. Miller, C. Cao, K. P. Davy, T. LeRoith and E. M. Schmelz, Food Funct., 2010, 1, 90
DOI: 10.1039/C0FO00108B

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