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Issue 11, 2018
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Environmental transformation of natural and engineered carbon nanoparticles and implications for the fate of organic contaminants

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Abstract

Environmental transformation of carbon nanoparticles can significantly affect their transport, fate, and effects. The last decade of environmental nano-science has often focused on understanding the behavior of well-defined engineered carbon nanoparticles (eCNPs) in the natural environment. However, more complex pyrogenic/petrogenic carbon nanoparticles (pCNPs), including those derived from soot, fossil coal, wildfire charcoal, and biochar, are more than four orders of magnitude more abundant in the environment. This paper aims to review findings from investigations into eCNPs and to consider their transferability to pCNPs, in order to improve our understanding of pCNPs and identify gaps in our knowledge. Findings from previous investigations into the chemical, physical and biological transformation of larger carbonaceous particles, as well as of eCNPs, can help us to understand the transformation of pCNPs. The transformation of soot during atmospheric transport is relatively well documented, whereas the transformation of pCNPs in soil, sediment, and aqueous systems remains poorly understood. To bridge findings on particulate transport, contaminant binding, and contaminant transformation from eCNPs to pCNPs, the complex compositions of pCNPs need to be taken into account. We therefore suggest that future research on pCNP transformation should focus on changes in intrinsic porosity and on interactions with non-carbonized phases, tar phases, and mineral phases, as well as with organo-mineral complexes in soils, sediments and water bodies.

Graphical abstract: Environmental transformation of natural and engineered carbon nanoparticles and implications for the fate of organic contaminants

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Publication details

The article was received on 22 Jun 2018, accepted on 30 Sep 2018 and first published on 01 Oct 2018


Article type: Critical Review
DOI: 10.1039/C8EN00676H
Citation: Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2018,5, 2500-2518
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
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    Environmental transformation of natural and engineered carbon nanoparticles and implications for the fate of organic contaminants

    G. Sigmund, C. Jiang, T. Hofmann and W. Chen, Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2018, 5, 2500
    DOI: 10.1039/C8EN00676H

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      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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