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Issue 2, 2011
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The occurrence of the herbicide dalapon (2,2-dichloropropionate) in potable water as a disinfection by-product

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Abstract

Salts of 2,2-dichloropropionic acid, such as dalapon, are well known as herbicides and are regulated as such in potable water in Australia and elsewhere. It is also an identified disinfection by-product (DBP), but little is known about the compound's formation and typical levels from this source. This work presents results from a sampling campaign where 2,2-dichloropropionate was found at levels between 0.1 and 0.5 µg l−1 in potable water samples from a major treatment plant in South East Queensland, Australia. However, levels were below the reporting limit (0.01 µg l−1) in the immediate source water for the plant. Also, temporal trends in 2,2-dichloropropionate observed in treated water during sampling mirrored those of trihalomethanes albeit at much lower concentrations, suggesting that the occurrence is due to in situ formation as a DBP. This could present a regulatory dilemma in some jurisdictions.

Graphical abstract: The occurrence of the herbicide dalapon (2,2-dichloropropionate) in potable water as a disinfection by-product

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Publication details

The article was received on 06 Sep 2010, accepted on 23 Nov 2010 and first published on 17 Dec 2010


Article type: Communication
DOI: 10.1039/C0EM00475H
J. Environ. Monit., 2011,13, 252-256

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    The occurrence of the herbicide dalapon (2,2-dichloropropionate) in potable water as a disinfection by-product

    D. W. Hawker, J. L. Cumming, A. Watkinson and M. E. Bartkow, J. Environ. Monit., 2011, 13, 252
    DOI: 10.1039/C0EM00475H

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